Newsletter: Are we there yet?

Hi divers

Weekend dive plans

TBC

Spring flowers in the Karoo
Spring flowers in the Karoo

Signs of spring are around: some flowers, some south easterly winds and a taste of southerly swell. However, the daytime maximum temperatures are not even close to my preferred number of 30 degrees celcius. This weekend I think diving will be best on Sunday but (thanks to a persistent dose of the flu) as yet I have not planned for anything. If you have some specific need then hit me up.

Open Book Festival

If you’re interested in the poaching of South Africa’s marine resources (as a challenging and topical issue, not as a personal hobby), there’s a talk on Sunday that you might find interesting. Kimon de Greef – author of several articles on abalone poaching, and a forthcoming book on the subject – will be in discussion with Max du Preez and Jeremy Vearey at the Open Book Festival. More information here.

regards

Tony Lindeque
076 817 1099
www.learntodivetoday.co.za
www.learntodivetoday.co.za/blog/

Diving is addictive!

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Newsletter: Batten down the hatches

Hi divers

Weekend dive plans

No diving

Fish Hoek Beach on a stormy evening
Fish Hoek Beach on a stormy evening

We have not had that much in the way of proper stormy weather this winter, however, that seems set to change for the weekend. Strong winds, big swell and lots of rain don’t bode well for any diving activities… Unless it is in the aquarium.

regards

Tony Lindeque
076 817 1099
www.learntodivetoday.co.za
www.learntodivetoday.co.za/blog/

Diving is addictive!

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Newsletter: Who you gonna call?

Hi divers

Weekend dive plans

Saturday: Boat dives from False Bay Yacht Club

The forecast for Saturday looks rosy so we will launch from the Simon’s Town jetty at 9.30 and 12.00. Both dives will be shallow, most likely Roman Rock and Photographer’s Reef. False Bay is a little patchy so dive sites might change.

Yoshi the loggerhead turtle
Yoshi the loggerhead turtle

Turtles

Amazingly, we still meet people who don’t realise that baby sea turtles – and even big ones, if they’re poorly – can’t survive for long in the cold waters around the Western Cape. Luckily the Two Oceans Aquarium has a well-developed turtle rehab facility, where they look after turtle hatchlings and older turtles brought in by members of the public.

The turtles receive veterinary treatment, vitamin supplements, a healthy diet, and excellent care from a dedicated team of aquarists. The aim is to return all the turtles that regain sufficient health to survive independently, to the wild, as most sea turtle species are vulnerable. These turtles are released in each year in December, when the warm Agulhas current is at its closest to Cape Point, giving the turtles their best chance of survival. The most famous release story is Yoshi, who swam all the way to Angolan waters, and is now off Namibia again, heading south. Maybe she misses us.

If you find a stranded sea turtle, keep it safe and dry, and notify the aquarium as soon as possible. The NSRI can assist with large turtles, and know how to help. There’s more information on what to do here.

Like turtles? Want to read about turtle science in South Africa? We have just the book for you.

Diversnight 2018

This year, Diversnight is on Saturday 3 November. The aim is for as many divers to be underwater at 20h18 as possible. More details to follow closer to the time!

regards

Tony Lindeque
076 817 1099
www.learntodivetoday.co.za
www.learntodivetoday.co.za/blog/

Diving is addictive!

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Newsletter: Total eclipse

Hi divers

Weekend dive plans

No diving

Moon jellies
Moon jellies

We are headed to the Tankwa Karoo for some star (and moon) gazing this weekend, so I won’t be launching. Will see you all next week!

Shark Spotters app

The Shark Spotters mobile app has been nominated for an award for best use of tech by an NGO, and your help with voting would be much appreciated by the team. Go here to vote. It’s a lot of multiple choice votes but five minutes of your time would mean a lot! You can find links to download the very useful Shark Spotters app here.

regards

Tony Lindeque
076 817 1099
www.learntodivetoday.co.za
www.learntodivetoday.co.za/blog/

Diving is addictive!

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Newsletter: Clean bay

Hi divers

Weekend dive plans

Sunday: Boat dives from False Bay Yacht Club, conditions dependent

View of the Atlantic from the top of the tower
View of the Atlantic from the top of the Kommetjie lighthouse

The wind direction has been great and False Bay is very clean, if a little cold. The weekend has some southeasterly wind forecast and we will still feel the effects of the current 6-7 metre swell. Luckily the swell is westerly so it won’t be that harsh.

I have a dry day planned for Saturday, but will launch on Sunday if the weather behaves. I will have limited access to my phone tomorrow and Saturday so please let me know sooner rather than later if you want to dive.

regards

Tony Lindeque
076 817 1099
www.learntodivetoday.co.za
www.learntodivetoday.co.za/blog/

Diving is addictive!

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Newsletter: Signs of winter

Hi divers

Weekend dive plans

No launches planned – diving on Tuesday and Wednesday next week!

The weekend has typical winter conditions. A long period swell of around 5-6 metres with 30 – 40 kilometre/hour winds means really rough and bumpy surface conditions, not the kind of conditions I enjoy diving in. We have no planned launches. Go flower hunting instead. (The flower in the picture, Hessea cinnamomea, only blooms the winter after a fire, and then goes dormant, sometimes for decades, until the next burn.)

Hessea cinnamomea at Cape Point
Hessea cinnamomea at Cape Point

The visibility is decent and that won’t change too soon. Tuesday and Wednesday have less swell and very little wind so we will launch then. Download a leave form and complete it, and send it in to whoever will miss you if you don’t turn up at work… And join us for some aquatic therapy.

regards

Tony Lindeque
076 817 1099
www.learntodivetoday.co.za
www.learntodivetoday.co.za/blog/

Diving is addictive!

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Newsletter: Not too shabby

Hi divers

Weekend dive plans

No diving

False Bay has not been too shabby at all, and the visibility has been rather good. There is some hectic wind and rain in the forecast for Saturday, but by Sunday it is mostly over.

We are not launching this weekend, but my suggestion would be a boat dive for Sunday to get clear of the run off from the heavy rain, however there are sometimes shore dive sites with crystal clear water after the wind and rain. Best you take a drive and look before you leap, and pack a flask of hot chocolate for after the dive.

Danger Beach in False Bay
Danger Beach in False Bay

Tidal pools

Cape Town’s tidal pools are a national treasure. The City of Cape Town has been experimenting with an environmentally friendly cleaning protocol, to preserve the abundant marine life that these pools house. In order to effect the cleaning more efficiently, a high pressure hose would help. Does the city have budget allocated for it? No, of course not. (We’re showering with buckets, remember.) Are some enterprising ocean lovers running a crowd funding campaign to get one for the city to use? You betcha. Donate here. They’re almost at their target. It’s worth it.

regards

Tony Lindeque
076 817 1099
www.learntodivetoday.co.za
www.learntodivetoday.co.za/blog/

Diving is addictive!

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Newsletter: Cooler days

Hi divers

Weekend dive plans

Sunday: Boat or shore dives

Storm clouds over Kalk Bay
Storm clouds over Kalk Bay

With the rain comes cooler daytime temperatures and slightly colder water. The plus side is the visibility is very decent at this time of year. The weekend looks really good for diving and I think Sunday will be the better day.

I am out on the boat tomorrow, so I will have a better idea whether we launch or shore dive. Get in touch if either of these activities tickles your fancy.

regards

Tony Lindeque
076 817 1099
www.learntodivetoday.co.za
www.learntodivetoday.co.za/blog/

Diving is addictive!

To subscribe to receive this newsletter by email, use the form on this page!

Bookshelf: Antarctica

Antarctica: An Intimate Portrait of the World’s Most Mysterious Continent – Gabrielle Walker

THIS is the book about the Antarctic that I have been looking for all of my life. It’s unlikely that this discovery will stop my obsessive consumption of polar-related literature and documentary material, but this is likely a book I will return to again.

Antarctica
Antarctica

The author, a science writer, has visited Antarctica several times, and is thus able to weave her personal experiences of  life on the driest continent with accounts of the science taking place there, and the scientists doing the work. Walker has had the sort of access to the scientists that most of us can only dream of, and makes reasonably good use of it.

Mixed in with stories of her Antarctic travels and meetings with researchers, Walker also briefly recounts the stories of some of the explorers of last century who opened up the interior of the continent. She is able to visit Western Antarctica, a part of the continent that very few people get to, and where the effects of climate change can be seen most clearly.

There’s a much more comprehensive review from The Guardian here. If you’re interested in the Antarctic, and the science that is being done there, you should read this book.

Get a copy here (South Africa), here or here.

Bookshelf: Pain Forms the Character

Pain Forms the Character: Doc Bester, Cat Hunters & Sealers – Nico de Bruyn & Chris Oosthuizen

Marion Island is one of South Africa’s two sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands, technically part of the Western Cape province. The South African National Antarctic Programme runs a meteorological and biological station there, dedicated to research. The researchers study weather and climate, ecosystem studies, seals (southern elephant seals, and Antarctic and sub-Antarctic fur seals), killer whales and seabirds such as albatross, that nest on the island. Researchers usually spend either three or 15 months at a stretch on the island, whose rugged terrain, intimidating wildlife and challenging weather can be said to “form the character”!

Pain Forms the Character
Pain Forms the Character

Marion Island is also infested by rats, introduced from whaling ships in the 1800s. With no predators, they multiplied to the extent that they threatened seabird populations. Cats were introduced in 1949, and by the 1970s there were 3,400 cats on the island. The cats ate mice, of course, and seabirds. An ambitious eradication program – of which our incredible friend Andre was part – eliminated the last of the cats in the early 1990s. The rat problem has resurged since the cats were removed, but work is in progress to get rid of them, too.

The research programs that currently exist on Marion Island are the legacy of Dr Marthan “Doc” Bester’s 40 year career as a scientist and researcher, and this book is a tribute to him. For this book, authors compiled photographs and testimonies from Bester’s colleagues, former cat hunters, and students, and he is the thread that ties this beautifully produced volume together. The focus is less on the scientific findings (you can find those online), and more on what it’s like to live on Marion Island, with the text complemented by many, beautifully evocative photographs.

Get a copy of the book here.