Warty pleurobranch and egg ribbon

Sea life (to be): Eggs

Two minute noodles
Two minute noodles

I find it very hard to identify eggs, unless (see below) I catch the creature in the act of laying. Then there’s no doubting their provenance. We see a lot of the two minute noodle kind, above, at Long Beach, but I am not sure who lays them. Does anyone know?

Orange clubbed nudibranch eggs on bryzoans on a kelp blade
Orange clubbed nudibranch eggs on bryzoans on a kelp blade

Orange clubbed nudibranchs live on kelp and have a very particular bryzoan diet. Their eggs are usually found near their food.

Shyshark egg cases at Long Beach
Shyshark egg cases at Long Beach

Shark egg cases – also referred to as mermaid’s purses, and much beloved of little girls at the aquarium – are easy to identify. Catshark egg cases are slightly larger, and usually whitish in colour.

Scaly dogwhelk eggs
Scaly dogwhelk eggs

We also see a lot of scaly dogwhelk eggs. Each little compartment has several eggs (the little yellow balls) in it. Only one snail will emerge from each compartment, however – the first hatcher or strongest whelk will eat all the other eggs he’s been sharing space with.

Scaly dogwhelk eggs (hatched) on a sea squirt
Scaly dogwhelk eggs (hatched) on a sea squirt

No one seems quite sure who lays these beautiful, pearlescent eggs, apart from the fact that it’s some kind of whelk. Tony found a pink lady with two of these eggs on its shell… So far that’s our best guess as to who they belong to!

Whelk eggs at A Frame
Whelk eggs at A Frame

Finally, here’s a warty pleurobranch caught in the act of laying its eggs. It has allowed the egg ribbon to get twined around some of the sea grass at Long Beach.

Warty pleurobranch and egg ribbon
Warty pleurobranch and egg ribbon

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Clare

Lapsed mathematician, creator of order, formulator of hypotheses. Lover of the ocean, being outdoors, the bush, reading, photography, travelling (especially in Africa) and road trips.

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