Tony behind the monument

Dive sites (Malta): Atlam Sub Aqua Club commemorative plaque

Divemaster Sergey hovers near the statue
Divemaster Sergey hovers near the statue

The Atlam Sub Aqua Club (Atlam is Malta spelled backwards) put this commemorative plaque and statue of an old fashioned diver’s helmet up in 2005 to celebrate their 50th anniversary. It’s located in about 28 metres of water on the way to the Um El Faroud off Weid iz Zurrieq in Malta, one of the most magnificent wreck dives in the Mediterranean, and as such provides a useful navigational aide.

The statue is a navigational aid to finding the Um El Faroud shipwreck
The statue is a navigational aid to finding the Um El Faroud shipwreck

While we’re on the subject of diving helmets, here are two more that we found on our travels…

The dive details below are for the dive on the Um El Faroud during which we visited the plaque.

The statue depicts an old fashioned diving helmet
The statue depicts an old fashioned diving helmet

Dive date: 5 August 2011

Air temperature: 31 degrees

Water temperature: 22 degrees

Maximum depth: 34.3 metres

Visibility: 20 metres

Dive duration: 49 minutes

Six years of encrustation does not amount to much in these waters
Six years of encrustation does not amount to much in these waters
Tony behind the monument
Tony behind the monument

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Clare

Lapsed mathematician, creator of order, formulator of hypotheses. Lover of the ocean, being outdoors, the bush, reading, photography, travelling (especially in Africa) and road trips.

4 thoughts on “Dive sites (Malta): Atlam Sub Aqua Club commemorative plaque”

  1. With just sand and Posidonia surrounding the helmet, I suspect anything settling out onto the base or plaque will get browsed by the fish fairly quickly.

    Also the algal species that grow in the light always seem to out settle the majority of the other sessile invertebrate species like anemones, sponges and bryozoa – the richer invertebrate ecosystems are under the rock overhangs or in the many caverns and caves around the Maltese archipeligo.

    Still, having healthy Posidonia beds at 28m does say something about the quality of the visibility 🙂

    1. Hi Rob! You’re right – we did see a lot more invertebrates under overhangs and in the caves. We were totally blown away by the visibility in Malta… at home in Cape Town we get really happy with 10-12 metres!

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